10 Years of Rendering Proprietary Vector Graphic Content

1997 was the releasing year of Macromedia Flash 2. Since then, GNU/Linux became the most progressive operating system, mySQL is one of the most popular database on earth. Firefox has bitten and beaten IE, and Open-Source software is the hottest thing Intel processors ever calculate. Yet, at this moment, in case my artistic soul has the desire of rendering slickly content over the web I am bound to do it using proprietary software.

The only browser which fully supports SVG is Opera, Firefox implements many features but not all. VML comes from the same streets that Windows came from. Canvas is owned by Steve Jobs, Flash is a proprietary of adobe [and I don’t feel like going into WHATWG and HTML5 and all the political arguments].

In March 2001, that is 6.5 years ago, Jeffrey Zeldman published an article titled: “SMIL When You Play That” and yet, I can barely remember myself seeing websites using this method.

On the other hand, in the  DHTML/DOM/JS field, we have many of the same, a great collection of community supported cross-browser libraries such as: YUI; Prototype+Scriptaculous;  jQuery; Mochikit; Dojo and many more, each of which dose more or less the same, making web development as easier and elegant as possible.

I wish I had enough time and knowledge require to push this into Mozilla. I just think it is time to do to Flash whatever was done to IE and Windows, taking away the monarchy and give us the freedom and comfort of open sourced technology.

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3 Comments on “10 Years of Rendering Proprietary Vector Graphic Content”

  1. stelt says:

    SVG is becoming more of a “native on anything but IE” kind of thing, no too bad with IE numbers dropping and even new plug-in options coming up.
    Check http://svg.startpagina.nl

  2. @Stelt
    Let us assume that IE Users will stay with us for the next decade. And let us assume that IE popularity rate will be at least whatever Opera has today. Since today I check my code with Opera, I see no reason to skip on IE.

    One should always separate MS the corporate and its end-users. Many of IE users are not aware of the alternative existence at all, and even if they do, they are not that familiar with installing a new browser.

    PS:
    In my opinion, sooner or later IE will become an *OPEN SOURCED BROWSER* (it would be a late step by ms in order to save it self esteem). Which will extend its scope a little more.

  3. stelt says:

    With loads of discussion on Vista recently, ODF taking on and about every big laptop brand also doing Linux now, the general public starts to find out there’s more than “what MS wants” and it’s not difficult as also non-geeks use it.


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